I was going to shoot from the gut

This gem was said in reaction to helping a family friend, and the speaker wanted to be as spontaneous as possible.  It is a blend of two phrases, “shoot from the hip”, and “a gut reaction”, both relating to doing or saying something quickly, or immediately responding.  Of course, shooting from the gut also occurs after too much partying.  A big thank you to Nate Brogin for uttering this one and passing it on!


He is shooting for the fences

I heard this gem on this morning’s Meet the Press.  Helene Cooper, a New York Times correspondent, was discussing President Obama’s proactive week, including his executive authority to issue an executive order regarding immigration.  I believe she was wanting to say  “swinging for the fences”, meaning to try and accomplish bold ideas, but mixed it with “shooting for (something)” meaning to aim for.

 


You are shooting yourself in the foot to spite your face

Yes, that is what Sarah blurted out to her husband, and then she realized she had unintentionally uttered a malaphor.  As she said, “this is what sleep deprivation and being newly post partum will do to someone.”  The malaphor is a mix of “shooting yourself in the foot” (to cause yourself difficulty) and “cut off your nose to spite your face” (to hurt yourself in an attempt to hurt another).   Both phrases have to do with doing damage to oneself, literally (cutting and shooting) and figuratively.  Sarah’s malaphor contains serious damage!   Thanks to Sarah for sending this one in!


I’m shooting from the cuff

This is a wonderful malaphor involving the phrases “off- the- cuff” (speak spontaneously without rehearsal) and “shooting from the hip”  (speaking frankly).   Phil Jackson, in deciding to take over the New York Knicks, uttered this malaphor at the beginning of his acceptance speech.  Click on the link below and then click on the video in the link.. He says, in the opening sentence, that “I’m shooting from the cuff.”    Thanks to Martin Pietrucha for hearing this one and passing it on!

Phil Jackson shook hands with New York Knicks owner James Dolan, walked gingerly to the podium and comfortably lifted the microphones to fit his 6-foot-8 frame.

“I don’t have prepared remarks, as you can see,” Jackson said, practically bragging. “I’m shooting from the cuff.”

http://nyti.ms/1j3p3dw

Phil Jackson, the new president of the New York Knicks, answers questions during a news conference, Tuesday, March 18, 2014 in New York. Jackson, who won...


JFK was a duck in a barrel

Picture of President Kennedy in the limousine ...

Picture of President Kennedy in the limousine in Dallas, Texas, on Main Street, minutes before the assassination. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This phrase mixes “sitting duck” (someone vulnerable to an attack)  and “shooting fish in a barrel” (ridiculously easy).  A big thanks to Michael Ameel for hearing this one on a radio program recently about the Kennedy assassination.  An expert on the show indicated that JFK was an easy target, and blurted out this malaphor.   It is similar to the 1/16/13 entry, “It’s like shooting ducks in a barrel”.


It’s like shooting ducks in a barrel

This is a mash up of “shooting fish in a barrel” (easy action with guaranteed success) and “all your ducks in a row” (getting everything in order), submitted by a loyal follower, the TruroTattler.   Given the enormous amount of google hits, this is a common malaphor, as ducks appear to be as easy a target as fish.  Also shooting mechanical ducks in a penny arcade shooting gallery is certainly playing on the mind in this one.