That ought to hit the ticket

This was said, referring to something that should be successful.  It is a congruent conflation of “hit the mark” and “punch (one’s) ticket”, both meaning an action that leads to success (the latter to a promotion usually).  Hit the ticket has a nice ring to it.  A big thanks to Martin Pietrucha for texting this one and realizing it was a malaphor.


You hit it right off the park

This was heard on a conference call.  This is a nice baseball metaphor mashup of “hit it out of the park” (to do something successful or an outstanding achievement) and “right off the bat” (immediately, without delay).  Now if the person had hit it right off the bat and out of the park that would be an immediate outstanding achievement, right?  Or just a home run?  By the way, it seems like hitting it out of the park is a favorite idiom to mashup.  A few past examples for your reading pleasure are “we really nailed it  out of the park” https://malaphors.com/2015/08/18/we-really-nailed-it-out-of-the-park/ and “they blew it out of the park” https://malaphors.com/2012/10/27/they-blew-it-out-of-the-park/   A big thanks to Mike Kovacs for hearing this one and sending it in right off the park to malaphor central.


Facebook is a bubble chamber

The “Great Malaphor Hunter”, Mike Kovacs, uttered this one at lunch the other day.  He was talking about Facebook posts and how people don’t engage in actual discussions with others with opposing views.  This is a nice mashup of “live in a bubble” (separated from society or sheltered) and “echo chamber” (a metaphorical description of a situation in which beliefs are amplified or reinforced by communication and repetition inside a closed system). When I heard this, I immediately thought of Get Smart and the “cone of silence”.  A big thanks to Anthony Kovacs for outting his Dad, malaphorically speaking.

It’s not too late to stuff that stocking with THE book on malaphors, “He Smokes Like a Fish and other Malaphors”, available on Amazon for a mere 7.99.  https://www.amazon.com/dp/0692652205  That’s cheaper than those Altoids you were thinking of dropping in the Christmas sock.


I was elected to “Clean the Swamp”

This was uttered by President Trump in a December 5, 2019 tweet.  Here it is:

..trial in the Senate, and so that our Country can get back to business. We will have Schiff, the Bidens, Pelosi and many more testify, and will reveal, for the first time, how corrupt our system really is. I was elected to “Clean the Swamp,” and that’s what I am doing!

Trump’s mantra has always been “drain the swamp”, so I believe this is a malaphor, conflating “drain the swamp” with “clean house”, both meaning to wipe out corruption or inefficiency.   A big thanks to Sandor Kovacs for spotting this one and sending it in.


Trump walked in like an elephant in a china shop

Nicole Wallace on Morning Joe uttered this nice malaphor.  It is a mashup of “bull in a china shop” (one who is aggressive and clumsy in a situation that requires care and delicacy) and “the elephant in the room” (an obvious truth or fact that is being intentionally ignored or left unaddressed).   Not sure what would cause more damage in a china shop – a bull or an elephant? By the way, elephants are a common source of malaphors: just type the word “elephant” in the search engine on my website and you will find a treasure trove of elephant malaphors.  a big thanks to Donna Calvert for hearing this one and passing it on.

Want to see more elephant malaphors?  Chedk out my book, “He Smokes Like a Fish and other malaphors” and see a whole chapter devoted to pachyderm mashups.  Available on Amazon for a cheap $7.99.


middle of the ground

The speaker was talking about taking a centrist approach.  This is a nice mashup of “middle ground” (compromise) and “middle of the road” (moderate or centrist).  Both idioms have the word “middle” and both describe the center of something, hence the mixup.  A big thanks to Katie Norwood for uttering this one and sharing it!

Did you like this malaphor?  Then get the best stocking stuffer around, the classic book on malaphors, “He Smokes Like a Fish and other Malaphors”, available on Amazon for a cheap 7.99 (that’s cheaper than the toothbrush and toothpaste you were going to add to the stocking).  After the holidays the book can be a great addition to any bathroom library.  https://www.amazon.com/dp/0692652205

 


Let’s kick this down the line

The Queen of Malaphors, Naomi David, is back!  She uttered this beauty, which is a mashup of “kick this around” (mull over or consider something) and “down the line” (in the future), creating a definition of thinking about something for the future.  She may also have been thinking “up the line” (through the chain of command).  And of course she may have been thinking of “kicking the can down the road” (avoiding making a decision) although I believe the context was brainstorming.  A big thanks to Katie Norwood who passed this one on.