The Republicans run cover for Trump

Political pundit Charlie Sykes uttered this one on MSNBC’s Hardball (hosted by the Malaphor King, Chris Matthews – see website for the many contributions).  This is a mashup of “run point” (take the lead) and “give cover” (protect from attack).  Perhaps Mr. Sykes was thinking (or hoping) about “running for cover”, but there is no indication any Republican is doing that at this point.  A big thanks to Frank King for hearing this one and sharing it.


He tried to steal the wind out of your sails

The submitter’s wife was talking about someone who was going to upstage him.   This is a nice mashup of “steal your thunder” (garner the attention or prasie that one had been expecting for some accomplishment) and “take the wind out of your sails”(diminish one’s enthusiasm about something).  Both phrases involve taking away something from someone.  Also, sails and wind often are accompanied by thunder, right?   A big thanks to Martin Pietrucha for  hearing this one and passing it on.


What a flash from the past!

This was uttered in response to finding a  cake topping used in childhood.  It’s a congruent conflation of ‘blast from the past” and “flashback”, both describing something that evokes a sense of nostalgia.  “Blast” and “past” are similar sounding.  A big thanks to Nick Mamalis for saying this one and Elaine Hatfield for sharing it.


We’re as thick as two thieves in a pod

This one comes from the tv show Scrubs.  While intentional, it’s a classic malaphor and worth posting (although it does go against the rules that the malaphor spoken or written should be unintentional).  Still, too good to pass up.  It’s a mashup (of course) of “thick as thieves” (a close alliance or friendship) and “like two peas in a pod” (similar interests or beliefs).  This one works on many levels – similar idioms, and the rhyme of “peas” and “thieves”.  A big thanks to Elly Pietrucha for spotting this one on a rerun.

We were thick as two thieves in a pod.

 


The doors are closing in

Gregory Meeks (D-NY) said this one on “Ths Last Word” – “…the Republicans have no way out, the doors are closing in…”  It is a congruent conflation of “the walls are closing in” and “the doors are closing”, both meaning running out of time and the end is nearing.  Doors and walls can be confusing.  A big thanks to Frank King for hearing this one and sending it in.

Quid pro quo is one of these things to muddy the works

This gem was uttered by Congressman Jim Himes (D-CT) yesterday on Meet the Press, talking about the Trump impeachment inquiry.  It is a mashup of “muddy the waters” (to make a situation less clear) and “gum up the works” (to interfere with the proper functioning of something).   Both expressions refer to degrading something, and “works” and “waters” might have been jumbled by the phrase “water works”?   A big shout out to Bruce Ryan who heard this one and passed it on.  @jahimes @MeetThePress

You can hear this malaphor just about at the beginning of the video:

 

 


The top kahuna, Donald Trump

Former Watergate prosecutor Nick Akerman on MSNBC (Ari Melber’s show) uttered this gem, talking about Rudy Giuliani and the Ukrainians working for Trump.  It’s a mashup of “big kahuna” and “top dog”, both referring to a person in charge.  You can hear this one about 3 minutes into the video.  Link is:
https://www.msnbc.com/the-beat-with-ari/watch/-a-major-conspiracy-indicted-giuliani-aides-could-sing-to-feds-71931973526
This mixed idiom is similar to a similar malaphor posted a few years ago –  “head kahuna”, mixing once again “big kahuna” and this time “head honcho.  https://malaphors.com/2013/09/11/hes-the-head-kahuna/
A big thank you to Frank King for hearing this one and passing it on.  He’s the top kahuna of malaphors! @nickakerman