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They will kick the can down the bucket

The speaker was talking about whether the EU would give England another extension on Brexit, and that more than likely an extension would be approved.  This is a mashup of “kick the can down the road” (to postpone or defer a definitive action) and “kick the bucket” (to die).  “Kick” is the common word here, and “cans” and “buckets” are similar objects which probably led to the mixup.   I can’t help think that also the “ck” sound might have muddied the mental waters.  A big thanks to Nate Shand for uttering this one and then allowing me to share it with the malaphor world.

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We can’t keep kicking this issue down the can

I know it’s similar to other posts regarding malaphors on the idiom, “kick the can down the road”, but this one was again uttered in the political world and I can’t pass it up.  This time it is Bernie Sanders, appearing on the Andrea Mitchell show on MSNBC, talking about the DACA impasse between Congress and the president.  A big thanks to Mike Browning for spotting this one.


They are kicking the can down the table

Similar to the last post, this is another “kick the can down the road” malaphor.  Chuck Schumer, Senate Minority Leader, said this one on CNN.  He was explaining why he did not want to pass a CR.  This is a mashup of “kick the can down the road” (to postpone or defer an action) and I think “come to the table”(to meet to negotiate a particular issue or situation).  My guess is that Schumer combined these two thoughts as he is currently negotiating a deal to stop the government shutdown.  New Yorkers talk faster than their thoughts.  A big thanks to Beatrice Zablocki for hearing this one.


That issue always seems to get kicked down the can

This one was uttered by Fox news anchor Harris Faulkner, talking about Congress’s inability to deal with the budget.  It is a blend of “kick the can down the road” (to postpone or defer an action) and “kick in the can” (a forceful gesture or measure attempting to motivate someone).  A Canadian expression, “a kick at the can” (an opportunity to achieve something) might also be in the mix.  Is Faulkner Canadian?  A big thanks to Laszlo Veres
for hearing this one.

They are going to punt the ball down the road

This is another great mashup from a political pundit, this time heard on MSNBC.  It is a mix of “punt” (improvise or do something in a pinch) and “kick the can down the road” (to postpone or defer a definitive action).  So maybe they improvise while they delay?  A tip of the hat to Jim Kozlowski for hearing this one.