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He’s crazy as a bat

You can guess who the speaker was referring to.  This is a nice congruent conflation of “crazy as a bedbug (or loon)” and “batshit crazy”, both describing someone who is insane.  “Bats in the belfry” also come to mind, although that is an old-fashioned phrase.  “Crazy like a fox” (clever) might have been in the mix, but I doubt it based on the person the speaker was referring to.  Hint:  he denigrates war heroes, and even when they’re dead.

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He’s like a kid in a china shop

I heard this one from a neighbor.  She was talking about her husband’s love of gadgets, and that he recently received a new tool that he was crazy about.  This is an incongruent conflation of “like a kid in a candy shop” (so excited about something that they behave in a child-like way) and “like a bull in a china shop” (clumsily destructive).  The mixup derives from the similar sounding words “china” and “candy”, the word “shop” used in both phrases, and that the two phrases are equal in words and structure (“like a blank in a blank shop”).

 


That is a mixed sword

This unintended utterance is a nice congruent conflation of “mixed bag” and “double edged sword”, both referring to something that has benefits and problems.  Or maybe a Minecraft weapon?  A big thanks to Craig Ormson for uttering and sharing this one!


Right out of the get-go

This was heard on a podcast.  It is a nice congruent conflation of “from the get-go” and “right out of the gate” (immediately, right from the start).  Lots of alliteration in this one, contibuting to the mashup.  This is not a malaphor in Pittsburgh, however.  It means “just finished getting gas”.  A big thanks to Vicki Ameel-Kovacs for hearing this one!


It’s a collusion witch hoax

This one is self-evident – spoken by Trump to the press on March 8 after the Manafort sentencing.  This is a conflation of “witch hunt” (an attempt to blame and punish people who hold unpopular views and opinions, often under the guise of some other investigation) and “hoax” (to trick into believing as genuine something false).  Maybe it was used intentionally as shorthand talk, like “Tim Apple”.  A big thanks to Frank King for spotting this timely one.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/video/politics/trump-its-a-collusion-witch-hoax/2019/03/08/973e41b1-cd99-45f0-b9ce-1246390c8248_video.html?utm_term=.8bd8aa0a86f9


She’s lying out of her teeth

This one was uttered by a guy accused of shooting a woman in the face with a crossbow.  Heard on a Memphis local news network, WREG.  Here’s the video:

Man accused of shooting woman in face with crossbow denies claims: ‘She’s lying out of her teeth’

This is a conflation of “lying through (one’s) teeth” (to lie brazenly) and “out of (one’s) mind” (crazy).  Or is it possible she had dentures?  A big thanks to Lou Pugliese for hearing this one and sending it in.


That should give us a foot up

Overheard at a meeting.  It is a congruent conflation of “get a leg up”  and “a foot in the door”, both meaning to receive support or an advantage.  “Start off on the right foot” (to have a favorable or positive start) may also be in the mix.  I suppose getting a foot up is just a little advantage?  Kudos to Martin Pietrucha for hearing this one and passing it on.