Advertisements

He’s got nothing to hang his head on

University of Virginia basketball guard Kyle Guy was remarking on the 42 point performance of Carsen Edwards of Purdue, even though Purdue lost.  This is a brilliant mashup of “hang (one’s) head” (express shame or contrition) and  “hang (one’s) hat on (something)” (depend or rely on something).  “Hang” is in both expressions and “head” and “hat” are similar sounding and visually close.  A big thanks to Tom Justice for hearing this one.  Wahoowa!

Advertisements

Hang your heads high

This one jumped to the front of the queue, as it is very timely.  The speaker was discussing a recent NCAA mens’ basketball tournament game, and uttered this beauty about the Old Dominion University’s basketball game where they lost to Purdue in the first round.  The speaker tweeted:

Hang your heads high @ODUMensHoops. You all made us proud this season.  #MonarchMadness.  https://twitter.com/Brackintology/status/1108947588697317377

This is a nice incongruent conflation of “hang (one’s) head” (express shame or contrition) and “hold (one’s) head (up) high” (to display confidence and pride).  Perhaps the team is proud and ashame at the same time?  The mixup originates with the two similar sounding words, “hang” and “hold”.  A big thanks to Tom Justice who saw this one and sent it here to Malaphor Central.


This team never put their head between their knees

This phrase stands on its own, describing what one might do if one feels faint, but in context, it is a nice malaphor.  The speaker is Tom Seaver, discussing the 69 Mets team and how they came back from adversity and never quit.  Pretty sure he was mixing “not putting your tail between your legs” and “not hanging your head”, both expressions meaning not feeling ashamed or embarrassed.  “keep your head up” (feeling calm in the face of adversity) also seems in play here. Thanks to Steve Hubbard who heard this on the MLB Network regarding Cinderella teams.