My mood swings can change at a flip of a dime

A person was discussing his mood swings.  This is a nice congruent conflation of “flip-flop”  and “turn on a dime”, both meaning to change direction quickly.  “Flip (or toss) of a coin” (randomly) might also be in the mix given the words “of a”, and the mental image of someone flipping a dime might have entered in the speaker’s head.  As I have mentioned in previous posts, dimes seem to show up a lot in malaphors, possibly due to their use in various expressions – “turn on a dime, “stop on a dime”, “dropped the dime”, “get off the dime”, “nickel and dimed”, etc.  Some previous posts include “I fall asleep at the drop of a dime” (https://malaphors.com/2014/06/26/i-fall-asleep-at-the-drop-of-a-dime/) and “you had to figure out what to do on a dime’s notice” (https://malaphors.com/2014/05/20/you-had-to-figure-out-what-you-were-going-to-do-on-a-dimes-notice/).  A tip of the toque to Martha Fenimore for hearing this one and sending it in!


My perception has changed 180 degrees on a dime

Now that’s a change!  This was spoken on a television commercial for dog food.  A man is looking at ingredients on a can and realizes that it is the dog food he buys and contains a lot of unhealthy ingredients. He thought it was a good product until he saw the ingredients.  He then says that he will buy the dog food being touted. He says “My perception has changed 180 degrees on a dime.”  This is a conflation of “turning on a dime” (change directions very quickly) and “do a 180 degree turn” (to change opinion radically).  The word “change” might have prompted the speaker to think about money and so “dime” might have spit out in addition to the 180 degrees.  A big thanks to Diane Bufter for hearing this one and sending it in.  As she said in her post to me, “I give him extra points for not making the common mistake of saying “360 degrees” which gets you right back where you started.  Very true, Diane.  I hear that all the time (including from my lips!).


The weather can change on a dime

This was heard on a local CBS t.v. news promo.  It is a congruent conflation of “turn on a dime” and “change on a moment’s notice”, both meaning to act quickly.  This malaphor might have been caused by the word “change” as it relates to money, although I don’t get a whole lot of dimes anymore in change.  Dimes seem to show up a lot in malaphors, possibly due to their use in various expressions – “turn on a dime, “stop on a dime”, “dropped the dime”, “get off the dime”, “nickel and dimed”, etc.  Some previous posts include “I fall asleep at the drop of a dime” (https://malaphors.com/2014/06/26/i-fall-asleep-at-the-drop-of-a-dime/) and “you had to figure out what to do on a dime’s notice” (https://malaphors.com/2014/05/20/you-had-to-figure-out-what-you-were-going-to-do-on-a-dimes-notice/).  The latter was heard and submitted by the Master Spotter of Malaphors Steve Grieme, who also heard and sent me the one posted today!  Steve certainly is not a dime a dozen when it comes to malaphors.  He’s the top of the notch!

If you liked this malaphor, get a load of the malaphor book “He Smokes Like a Fish and other Malaphors”, available on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0692652205.  It’s a real page burner!