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Pelosi has all these Chairs on a tight rope

This one was found on the website The Daily Kos.  The writer was discussing how Nancy Pelosi controls the various House Subcommittees.  This is a nice blend of “walking a tightrope” (to do something with extreme care and precision) and “on a tight leash” (under someone’s strict control).  Both phrases have the word “tight” in them and “ropes” and “leashes” are similar items.  Also, both phrases entail exactness and control.  Here is the link to the malaphor:  https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2019/6/5/1862845/-NY-Offers-Chairman-Neal-Trump-s-Tax-Returns-Neal-Says-No-Thanks-Unbelievable

A tip of the hat to Barry Eigen who spotted this hidden creature in the word forest.

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That’s why I think the President was so steamed off this morning

This beauty was uttered by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, referring to Trump’s reaction to her comments about him engaging in a cover-up.  Here is the context:

“This is why I think the president was so steamed off this morning, because the fact is in plain sight, in the public domain, this president is obstructing justice and he’s engaged in a cover-up, and that could be an impeachable offense,” the San Francisco Democrat said at a progressive conference.

https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Pelosi-s-cover-up-remark-sets-Trump-off-13872325.php?psid=76uDZ

This is a nice congruent conflation of “pissed off” and “steamed (up)”, both meaning to be angry.  My guess is that Speaker Pelosi was thinking “pissed” but quickly realized that would not be a prudent thing to say in public.  Just guessing.  I will note for the record that “steamed off” is a phrase, but it normally means to leave or depart in an angry or animated manner.  A big tip of the hat to Mike Kovacs for hearing this one!