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She did not fall far from the turnip truck

This excellent mashup was overheard from a flight attendant.  It is a nice malaphor reflecting “just fell off the turnip truck” (ignorant or unsophisticated) and “the apple does not fall far from the tree” (someone is displaying traits or behaving in the same way as their relatives (usually parents)).  It actually might be a whole new phrase, describing someone displaying ignorance that is inherited.   Incidentally, the “turnip truck” idiom seems to be often garbled.  I have posted two other malaphors messing with this phrase:  “Does he think I just fell from the turnip tree?”  https://malaphors.com/2014/07/29/does-he-think-i-just-fell-from-the-turnip-tree/  and “I wasn’t born off the turnip truck”  https://malaphors.com/2013/12/07/i-wasnt-born-off-the-turnip-truck/.  I guess when things start falling they can come from anywhere and land anywhere.  A big thanks to Jody Compton for hearing this one and passing it on.

Did you like this one?  There are many more just like this in my book, “He Smokes Like a Fish and other Malaphors”, available on Amazon.  It makes a nice stocking stuffer!

English: A Turnip

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Does he think I just fell from the turnip tree?

The turnip truck idiom seems to be a tough one to remember and say correctly, as it was the subject of another malaphor posted last December, “I wasn’t born off the turnip truck” (December 7, 2013).   This new one appears to be a mash up of “fallen off the turnip truck” (someone unsophisticated or naiive) and “the apple does not fall far from the tree”  (inherited personality traits).  Perhaps “to fall off the wagon”  (back to drinking after a period of abstinence)  might be in the mix as well.  A tip of the hat to John Costello who admits he blurted this one out.