That really took the starch out of my sails

This is a conflation of several phrases.  The speaker was talking about his near death experience while cycling, so “it knocked the starch out of me” (to be beat up severely) may be in the mix, but I think the better phrase is “it took the starch out of me” (it made me tired or weak) as he was scared.  The other phrase is probably “it knocked the wind out of my sails” (heavy blow to the body) rather than “taking the wind out of my sails” (challenging someone’s boasting or arrogance).  A big shout out to Tom Justice for sending this one in!


It takes a lot to take the air out of my sails

This was uttered by a guy who was frustrated by a spin class:

Maybe I Signed Up for Karaoke Instead of Spin by Accident?

It takes a lot to take the air out of my sails, but an unimpressive spin class will do that to me right quick. I actually felt bad that I’d made a friend come with me to this class because it was a pretty uninspiring way to spend 45 minutes. I have a limited amount of time to dedicate to my fitness regime: I don’t have time to ef around like this…

http://blog.rateyourburn.com/blog/post/2012/09/24/class-review-the-ride-with-danielle-wettan-crunch.aspx

This is a mash up of “take the wind out of my sails” (feel less confident) and “let the air out of my tires” (make someone depressed).  I think he meant the latter.  See also a previous malaphor – “he took the thunder out of my sails”.


He took the thunder out of my sails

This is a mash up of “wind out of my sails”(someone’s boasting or arrogance is challenged) and “steal his thunder” (to lessen someone’s authority or force).  Apparently this speaker’s arrogance and power were both taken away.  I have also heard the malaphor “took the air out of my sails”, indicating weather mix-ups are a common occurrence.