We’re as thick as two thieves in a pod

This one comes from the tv show Scrubs.  While intentional, it’s a classic malaphor and worth posting (although it does go against the rules that the malaphor spoken or written should be unintentional).  Still, too good to pass up.  It’s a mashup (of course) of “thick as thieves” (a close alliance or friendship) and “like two peas in a pod” (similar interests or beliefs).  This one works on many levels – similar idioms, and the rhyme of “peas” and “thieves”.  A big thanks to Elly Pietrucha for spotting this one on a rerun.

We were thick as two thieves in a pod.

 


The doors are closing in

Gregory Meeks (D-NY) said this one on “Ths Last Word” – “…the Republicans have no way out, the doors are closing in…”  It is a congruent conflation of “the walls are closing in” and “the doors are closing”, both meaning running out of time and the end is nearing.  Doors and walls can be confusing.  A big thanks to Frank King for hearing this one and sending it in.

Democrats can’t just sit on their laurels

Karine Jean Pierre on Morning Joe November 4 uttered this one.  She was saying, “Donald Trump is not expanding his base…but Democrats can’t just sit on their laurels.”  It is a mashup of “sit on their hands” (refrain from acting) and “rest on your laurels” (rely on your past achievements).  Both expression refer to inaction rather than action, and sitting and resting are both sedentary actions, hence the mixup.  A big thanks to Frank King for hearing this one and passing it on.

Quid pro quo is one of these things to muddy the works

This gem was uttered by Congressman Jim Himes (D-CT) yesterday on Meet the Press, talking about the Trump impeachment inquiry.  It is a mashup of “muddy the waters” (to make a situation less clear) and “gum up the works” (to interfere with the proper functioning of something).   Both expressions refer to degrading something, and “works” and “waters” might have been jumbled by the phrase “water works”?   A big shout out to Bruce Ryan who heard this one and passed it on.  @jahimes @MeetThePress

You can hear this malaphor just about at the beginning of the video:

 

 


The top kahuna, Donald Trump

Former Watergate prosecutor Nick Akerman on MSNBC (Ari Melber’s show) uttered this gem, talking about Rudy Giuliani and the Ukrainians working for Trump.  It’s a mashup of “big kahuna” and “top dog”, both referring to a person in charge.  You can hear this one about 3 minutes into the video.  Link is:
https://www.msnbc.com/the-beat-with-ari/watch/-a-major-conspiracy-indicted-giuliani-aides-could-sing-to-feds-71931973526
This mixed idiom is similar to a similar malaphor posted a few years ago –  “head kahuna”, mixing once again “big kahuna” and this time “head honcho.  https://malaphors.com/2013/09/11/hes-the-head-kahuna/
A big thank you to Frank King for hearing this one and passing it on.  He’s the top kahuna of malaphors! @nickakerman

You dance with the devil you came with

Ike Reese (former football player for the Philadelphia Eagles) on the Marks and Reese sports talk radio show (WIP, 94.1), was discussing QB Carson Wentz’s risky play of diving and sliding to make a first down.  This is a nice mashup of “dance with the devil (or death)” (do something dangerous, risky or on the wild side) and “dance with the one that brung ya” (be loyal or attentive to the one who has been supportive).  So perhaps Ike was saying, “stick to the risky behavior that has made you successful”?  Maybe this can be a follow-up song for Shania Twain as well?  A big thank you to Linda Bernstein who heard this one and passed it on!

The book is running away from the charts

A TV host was interviewing an author, and commenting on the author’s successful book (on the NY Times bestseller list).  This seems to be a mashup of “run away with” (win handily) and “off the charts” (spectacular).  Both phrases refer to something or someone having success, hence the mixup in context.  A big thanks to Verbatim for hearing this one and sending it in.

Speaking of books running away from the charts, check out my malaphor book, “He Smokes Like a Fish and other Malaphors”, available on Amazon.  They’re selling like butter!  https://www.amazon.com/dp/0692652205