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It landed with a dud

This one was overheard at a meeting.  Someone was describing a failed product launch.  It is a congruent conflation of “landed with a thud” and “a dud”, both meaning something that did not work as intended, or was ineffective.  Of course dud and thud rhyme and sound alike, likely the source of the malaphor.  A big thanks to Peter Hopkins who heard this one and sent it in.

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It’s a collusion witch hoax

This one is self-evident – spoken by Trump to the press on March 8 after the Manafort sentencing.  This is a conflation of “witch hunt” (an attempt to blame and punish people who hold unpopular views and opinions, often under the guise of some other investigation) and “hoax” (to trick into believing as genuine something false).  Maybe it was used intentionally as shorthand talk, like “Tim Apple”.  A big thanks to Frank King for spotting this timely one.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/video/politics/trump-its-a-collusion-witch-hoax/2019/03/08/973e41b1-cd99-45f0-b9ce-1246390c8248_video.html?utm_term=.8bd8aa0a86f9


She’s lying out of her teeth

This one was uttered by a guy accused of shooting a woman in the face with a crossbow.  Heard on a Memphis local news network, WREG.  Here’s the video:

Man accused of shooting woman in face with crossbow denies claims: ‘She’s lying out of her teeth’

This is a conflation of “lying through (one’s) teeth” (to lie brazenly) and “out of (one’s) mind” (crazy).  Or is it possible she had dentures?  A big thanks to Lou Pugliese for hearing this one and sending it in.


That should give us a foot up

Overheard at a meeting.  It is a congruent conflation of “get a leg up”  and “a foot in the door”, both meaning to receive support or an advantage.  “Start off on the right foot” (to have a favorable or positive start) may also be in the mix.  I suppose getting a foot up is just a little advantage?  Kudos to Martin Pietrucha for hearing this one and passing it on.


It holds much weight

Jeremy Bash uttered this one the other night on the Malaphor channel, MSNBC.  It is a mashup of “carries much weight” (to wield importance or influence) and “holds water” (stands up to critical examination).  A subtle and commonly used malaphor.  Props to Frank King for hearing this one.


Tie the tea leaves together

.This was heard on NPR’s “Here and Now” show.  A pundit was talking about trying to predict what the Mueller investigation report will be like, based on all the information that has been released so far.  It is a mashup of “reading the tea leaves” (predicting on little bits of information) and “tie it all together” (finish it up neatly).  “Tie up loose ends” (resolve some issues at the end that are not critical) might also be in the mix.  Tea leaves seem to confuse folks.  Previous malaphors have included “reading between the tea leaves” https://malaphors.com/2017/03/27/reading-between-the-tea-leaves/ and “read between the tea lines” https://malaphors.com/2019/01/24/i-wish-i-could-read-between-the-tea-lines/.  A tip of the hat to John Costello for hearing this one!


I know this is not everyone’s dish of tea

William Weld, former Massachusetts governor, uttered this one on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, when he introduced the topic of climate change.  This is a mashup of “not one’s cup of tea” (not one’s preference) and maybe “dish it out” (to dispense something, often verbally)?  Or was the speaker just thinking of “cup and saucer” and got the two confused?  No one knows except Mr. Weld, and perhaps he doesn’t either.  On that note, I think I’ll have a “disha”.  A big thanks to two people who heard this one and sent it in almost simultaneously:  David Stephens and Donna Calvert.  Thanks David and Donna!